Sayonara Amerika, Sayonara Nippon


Yet Another Unjustly Overlooked Song by The Kinks

Posted in Music,The Kinks by bourdaghs on the July 25th, 2014

Do yourself a favor and take three minutes to listen to this 1971 recording, an outtake from the Muswell Hillbillies sessions.. Make sure you read Ray Davies’ lyrics, too. The song has everything: (working) class consciousness, a critique of urban renewal, a deft melody and la-di-doo-da nonsense syllables, which here take on distinct semiotic content. You’re welcome.

“Lavender Lane” (source)
Written by: Raymond Douglas Davies
Published by: Davray Music Ltd.

Daisy and Teddy had two Cockney boys
And two Cockney sisters and they all shared their toys
With old Rosie Rooke and Peggy O’Day
They all lived together down in Lavender Lane

Lavender Lane, oh my Lavender Lane
The people were poor and the people were plain
They didn’t have much but they shared what they gained
Contented to drift along Lavender Lane

Oh Lord, such a pity that the world’s gotta change

All of the houses were old and decayed
The people were proud who lived in Lavender Lane
Oh Lord, Lavender Lane
Oh Lord, Lavender Lane

Sometimes I wanna get back home and do the things we did before
And break down the old school tie, and all the la-di-do-dahs

The knobs and the toffs sent down two la-di-dahs
To mix with the people and to drink in their bars
They looked down their noses and they puffed their cigars
Instead of ‘off’ they say ‘orf’, instead of ‘yeah’ they say ‘ya’

And oh Lord
And Ted and Daisy said, ‘what a shame’

They’ll knock all the houses down for financial gain
And send all the people to a new town estate
Oh Lord, they gutted Lavender Lane
Whoa-oh, they gutted Lavender Lane

Sometimes I wanna get back home and do the things we did before
And break down the old school tie, and all the la-di-do-dahs

In the great London Council a decision was made
By the bright civil servants and the people in grey
They sent all their navvies with their buckets and spades
To knock all the houses down in Lavender Lane

But worst of all, they’ve taken all the people away
Now only memories are all that remain
Of all of the people down in Lavender Lane
Oh Lord, they gutted Lavender Lane
Whoa-oh, they gutted Lavender Lane
Whoa-oh, they gutted Lavender Lane
Whoa-oh, they gutted Lavender Lane

Watch and Listen to Yours Truly

Posted in J-Pop,Japanese literature,Music,Putting One Foot in Front of the Other by bourdaghs on the July 7th, 2014

It’s become common these days for universities to videotape public lectures and make them available online. A few talks I’ve given in recent years are available for your viewing pleasure, should you be so inclined.

Last October at the University of Chicago’s Humanities Day, I spoke about the curious life and career of Kasai “George” Jiuji, UChicago Class of 1913, and how his example might help us rethink the meaning of the Cold War and Japan’s role in it:

A few months before that, I gave a talk at Boston University on “Misora Hibari and the Popular Music of Cold War Japan: Mimesis, Alterity, Cosmopolitanism.”

Michael Bourdaghs, April 11 2013 from BU Center for the Study of Asia on Vimeo.

In addition, a 2013 talk at Penn State on Natsume Soseki and “Theorizing Literature from Japan, 1907″ is available online.

Another 2011 talk I gave on “Psychology and Natsume Soseki’s Mon (The Gate)” at the University of Michigan is available here.

If you prefer listening to watching me, a 2012 segment on Japanese popular music that I did for the public radio program “To the Best of Our Knowledge” is archived here. And if you want to hear what I sounded like as a callow lad of 19, you can hear the recently unearthed recording of a January 1981 interview with The Replacements (probably the band’s first-ever radio interview), back when I was a deejay for WMCN, Macalester College’s radio station.

On the whole, though, the printed word remains my medium of choice.

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On Lou Reed

Posted in Music,Putting One Foot in Front of the Other by bourdaghs on the October 28th, 2013

Since the unwelcome news of Lou Reed’s death arrived yesterday, I’ve been fascinated to read many different personal accounts about how people first encountered his music. The stories all more or less resemble one another, and yet they are all also indelibly personal.

For me, it was back in 1977 or 78. I was a high school student in St. Paul, and Reed and the Velvet Underground were mostly a rumor, a fascinating ghost that everyone knew about but no one had seen. Their records were out of print, and this was of course long before the Internet. Then I stumbled across a cheap used copy of the second VU album in eleventh grade. That scratched-up vinyl passed its way through the hands of all my friends, like a holy relic. Not long after, I came across another used-record treasure: Reed’s eponymous solo debut from 1972. Again, the album circulated among my friends; I wonder how many cassette tapes were recorded from it.

On Facebook the Minneapolis critic Jim Walsh yesterday reminded me of another crucial source of info we had: cover versions of VU songs by cool local bands. The Flamin’ Oh’s, for example, used to close sets with a fiery version of “Waiting for My Man.”

Then in 1979, my freshman year of college, I splurged and bought a new copy of the 1974 live “Rock and Roll Animal,” and that was that. I fell so hard in love with side one and its extended workouts on “Sweet Jane” and “Heroin” that I think a year or two passed before I even bothered to flip it over and listen to side two. That year I also bought Reed’s “Growing Up in Public” when it first came out; the album never got much critical respect, but it’s always been one of my favorites.

In the years that followed I gradually accumulated all of the VU albums, plus most of Reed’s solo works. I also discovered the solo career of John Cale, Reed’s VU bandmate, and even got to interview Cale circa 1982. But I didn’t get to see Reed play live until just a few years ago–the 2009 Lollapalooza Festival. Here’s how I wrote up my reaction to that show on an earlier incarnation of this blog:

After that [Neko Case's set] I caught a bit of Dan Auerbach’s neo-garage psychedelic set before retiring to a quiet spot in the grass to rest up a bit for the main event.

Which, for me anyhow, was Uncle Lou Reed. I first discovered Lou and the Velvets back in 1977, but I’d never seen him live before. Tonight’s set was in some ways disappointing, but in a Lou Reed kind of way: I’m gonna show you muthas that I don’t give a rat’s ass about Lollapalooza or any other show biz bullshit. So I guess that means it was good, right? He came on quite late, but all was forgiven with the opening chords to “Sweet Jane,” the first number. He then proceeded to play a string of remarkably obscure songs: “Waves of Fear,” Dirty Blvd.,” “Mad” and “Paranoia Key of E.” After that, we got about ten minutes of metal machine music, which finally morphed into the two-chord riff of “Waiting for the Man,” much to the crowd’s delight. He closed with “Walk on the Wild Side,” of course, and even smiled once or twice during it.

By strange coincidence, early last week I felt a sudden urge to revisit Reed. It had been a year or more since I’d last listened to him. As a result, my soundtrack during the week leading up to his death was spent in the company of his music — mostly “New York” and “Growing Up in Public.” In thinking about Reed, I also looked up some of Robert Christgau’s writings and came across the following review of “New York”:

Protesting, elegizing, carping, waxing sarcastic, forcing jokes, stating facts, garbling what he just read in the Times, free-associating to doomsday, Lou carries on a New York conversation–all that’s missing is a disquisition on real estate. [...] As usual, the pleasure of the lyrics is mostly tone and delivery–plus the impulse they validate, their affirmation that you can write songs about this stuff.

Christgau really puts his finger on something here. Reed’s songs are sometimes musically unmemorable (though of course he showed repeatedly that he could compose a killer riff or melody when he put his mind to it). His lyrics, while naked and sharp, don’t always make for great poetry when you read them off the page. But something happens when Reed sings those words to those tunes: a great New York voice takes over, funny and angry, wisecracking and wise. It’s the tone and the delivery–the voice.

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Last Friday’s Concert: Hayakawa Yoshio and Sakuma Masahide

Posted in J-Rock,Japanese literature,Music,Putting One Foot in Front of the Other by bourdaghs on the October 22nd, 2013

Thanks to all who turned out for last Friday’s concert at International House, University of Chicago, by Hayakawa Yoshio and Sakuma Masahide. It was the keynote performance for the 2013 Association for Japanese Literary Studies Annual Meeting. The theme of the conference was “Performance and Japanese Literature,” and the concert turned into a powerful instance of performance in all of its aspects: ephemeral, emotional, communal. Many in the audience ended up in tears, including those who spoke no Japanese and were responding solely to the music itself. The concert ended with three standing ovations and two encores.

In the weeks leading up to the event I wrote a series of blog entries here and on the conference website, introducing the performers and their music. I found it a struggle all along: song lyrics never submit willingly to translation, and I often found myself flailing as I tried to find apt words to convey what the pieces were doing. For example, I described Hayakawa’s composition “Tosan e no tegami” (Letter to my father) as an act of musical mourning. That never felt quite right, but I couldn’t find better words to name the performance the song carries out.

Watching it and the other pieces being played last Friday night, though, it hit me. The songs aren’t about mourning; they are about the struggle that art mounts against death. I didn’t feel it was my place to announce here or in introducing the band that Sakuma has been diagnosed with terminal stomach cancer and that this could turn out to be one his final live performances (Sakuma has himself been very frank about his illness on his own blog, where he writes movingly about the difficulties he has faced since the discovery of a brain tumor this past summer: often his hands won’t move the way he wants them to along the neck of his guitar). But Hayakawa mentioned the illness from the stage on Friday evening and turned the concert into a tribute to his longtime collaborator.

Suddenly, the songs took on a new hue. That magnificent coda in ”Karada to uta dake no kankei” (The direct relation between body and song), a cover of a song originally done by hi-posis but that Hayakawa has very much made his own, never felt so powerful. The pounding, repetitive music of the early verses, with their overtly sexual lyrics depicting music almost as a kind of animal rutting, suddenly shifts to a sweet, soaring melodic line, and Hayakawa sings with passion “Uta dake ga nokoru” (only the song remains: in other words, the only thing that will get out alive is the music itself). It’s always a cathartic moment, but under the circumstances on Friday it became unforgettable. Watching Hayakawa’s face as he sung and Sakuma’s hands as he played, the message was clear: we will all die soon enough, but as long as we are playing music, we’re still alive. And even after death wins out over us individually, the music will live on as a trace of our struggle.

It’s a theme Hayakawa returns to over and over in his compositions, especially in those from the years since his 1994 return to music. Art and eros are our only flimsy weapons in the fight to hold death at bay. Death will surely win in the end, but we will continue singing until then, and if we are lucky the song will persist after we are gone. It’s a simple message and not a particularly new one. Yet on Friday night, we could feel its truthfulness in our flesh, in the goosebumps and tears that the music summoned up.

The set list:

1) 「ひまわりの花」(Himawari no hana; Sunflowers): title song from Hayakawa’s 1995 solo album
2) 「赤色のワンピース」 (Akairo no wanpiisu; Red dress)
3) 「堕天使ロック」(Datenshi rokku; Fallen angel rock): one of two JACKS’ songs in the set
4) 「サルビアの花」 (Sarubia no hana: Salvia Flowers): Hayakawa’s best-known composition
5) 「H」 (H=Japanese slang for sexual desire)
6) 「躁と鬱の間で」(So to utsu no aida de; Between sadness and melancholy)
7) 「父さんへの手紙」 (Tosan e no tegami; Letter to my father)
8) 「身体と歌だけの関係」(Karada to uta dake no kankei; The direct relation between body and song)
9) 「青い月」(Aoi tsuki, Blue moon): a new song.
10) 「いつか」 (Itsuka; Sometime)
11) 「からっぽの世界」 (Karappo no sekai; Vacant world): JACKS’s debut single from 1968

First encore:
「この世で一番キレイなもの」(Kono yo de ichiban kirei na mono; The most beautiful thing in the world): title track from Hayakawa’s 1994 comeback solo album

Second encore:
「君でなくちゃだめさ」(Kimi de nakucha dame sa; Nobody but you)

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The Music of Hayakawa Yoshio (5): “Music”

Posted in J-Rock,Music by bourdaghs on the October 15th, 2013

(In anticipation of the October 18, 2013 concert by Hayakawa Yoshio and Sakuma Masahide at the University of Chicago, over the next few weeks I will be posting a series of entries here introducing Hayakawa’s music. More information about the concert, which is free and open to the public, is available here.)

iu mono wa shirazu

With the song “Music” (Ongaku), Hayakawa returns to a theme he’s explored in a number of compositions: the basic purpose of music. Suspicious of attempts to analyze his art rationally, Hayakawa seeks the meaning of music at a more basic, erotic level of emotion and physical existence. Musically, the song enacts its lyrical sentiment, stripping the arrangement down to the very basics: pulsating piano chords that underscore Hayakawa’s passionate vocals.

The song first appeared on his 2000 solo album, Hear songs from where there is no song (Uta wa uta no nai tokoro kara kikoete kuru). Hayakawa also included a concert performance of the song on his 2002 live album, Those who speak don’t understand, those who understand don’t speak (Iu mono wa shirazu, shiru mono wa iwazu).

Here is the original 2000 recording of the song:

“Music”
(Words and music by Hayakawa Yoshio)
English translation by Michael Bourdaghs

You can sing without your voice
Sounds come where there is no sound:
In the big round moon, in your smiling face
Life itself plays music

It’s not only songs that sing
A heart that feels is music
A word that gives courage, a teardrop that clarifies
To sing with every moment: that’s the ultimate

Words only reflect the heart
Speak or scream them, a mirror only reflects
But the truly wondrous defies interpretation
Music aims at something beyond music

What was I born to do?
It’s not always easy, this becoming myself
The brilliant sparks across the sky, music reverberates through flesh
With no particular goal, I walk on toward the end

********
“Ongaku”

Koe o dasanakutomo uta wa utaeru
Oto no nai tokoro ni oto wa orite kuru
Pokkari ukanda marui tsuki, anata no egao
Sonzai sono mono ga ongaku o kanaderu

Uta o utau no ga uta da to wa kagiranai
Kandō suru kokoro ga ongaku nan da
Yūki o morau hitokoto, yogore o otosu namida
Nichijō de utau koto ga nani yori mo suteki

Kotoba wa jibun no kokoro o utsushidasu mono
Nani o katatte mo sakende mo kagami ni utsuru dake
Hontō ni suburashii mono wa kaisetsu o kyozetsu suru
Ongaku ga mezashite iru no wa ongaku de wa nai

Boku wa nani o suru tame ni umarete kita no darō
Nando mo ochikominagaramo boku wa boku ni natte yuku
Yozora ni hanatsu ōkina hana, karada ni hibiku ongaku
Nan no yashin mo naku owari ni mukatte aruku

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Sakuma Masahide: Renaissance Man of J-Rock

Posted in J-Pop,J-Rock,Music by bourdaghs on the October 12th, 2013

Sakuma Masahide (佐久間正英) will be appearing with Hayakawa Yoshio in a free public concert here at the University of Chicago at 7:30 p.m. on October 18, 2013 (details here). A few words about Sakuma’s amazing career are certainly in order. He is a key figure in the history of Japanese popular music in many different guises–most notably, perhaps, as producer for more than 140 different acts that range across the spectrum, including such notable musicians as the Blue Hearts, BOØWY, HY, Judy and Mary, Teresa Teng, Glay, Soul Flower Union, Watanabe Misato, and L’Arc〜en〜Ciel.

Like Hayakawa, Sakuma is an alumnus of Wako University. While still a student, he began playing in folk groups. It was around 1975 when he joined the progressive rock group Yonin Bayashi (四人囃子) as its new bassist that he first attracted national attention. The band broke up a few years later, but Sakuma would be involved in a series of reunions that began in 1989 and have continued in the years since.

“Lady Violetta” by Yonin Bayashi, from their 1976 album, Golden Picnics:

From 1978-1981 Sakuma was a member of Plastics, a new wave band whose absurdist style and postmodern sound made them comrades to such Western contemporaries as the B-52s and Devo. Plastics enjoyed enormous critical success, both inside and outside of Japan. They toured regularly in North America and Europe, in addition to Japan, and appeared as musical guests on the SCTV program in North America. Trouser Press in its entry on the group describes them as ” A great, cool, original band that might just as well be from Mars.”

Plastics performing “Top Secret Man” live in Los Angeles, 1980

Sakuma’s career as a producer took off in earnest after the break up of Plastics. He also continued to be active as a performer and studio musician. In 1999, he became a member of NiNa, an international supergroup that brought together musicians from the B-52s (Kate Pierson), Judy and Mary (YUKI), the British new-wave band Japan (Mick Karn), Plastics (Sakuma and Shima Takemi), and acclaimed studio drummer Steven Wolf. The group released one album and several singles.

In 2001 Sakuma became a founding member of another international supergroup. The d.e.p. brought together Sakuma and Karn with Taiwanese vocalist Vivian Hsu 徐若瑄, Tsuchiya Masami (Ippu-Do), and Gota Yashiki (Simply Red). The name was an abbreviation of “doggie eels project.” As Sakuma would later explain,

“Dogs and eels are such a strange combination….The band is kind of like that. Putting Vivian (Hsu), Mick Karn, Gota (Yashiki) and all of us in a band together is such a strange combination.”

The band released one album and a couple of singles–and reformed briefly in 2010 to record new material in support of bandmate Karn after he announced that he was suffering from cancer.

Around 2004 Sakuma began collaborating with Hayakawa Yoshio, recording together and playing live–sometimes under the name Ces Chiens. In the decade since, they’ve continued to perform Hayakawa’s music, both from Hayakawa’s days as leader of the legendary 1960s underground folk-rock band the Jacks and from his subsequent solo career.

In 2008 Sakuma formed another band, unsuspected monogram. The unit includes members from a number of Japanese alternative rock bands and has so far released one album.

One other unique musical activity deserves mention. Beginning in 2010 Sakuma launched a remarkable series under the title “Goodnight to Followers.” For more than three years, every evening he would issue a new recording of an original composition to his followers on Twitter and Facebook. By the time he decided to slow down the pace of the project this past March, the series consisted of more than one thousand original pieces. The recordings from the series, mostly ambient acoustic numbers, are archived on Sakuma’s SoundCloud page. Here’s one typical piece from the project:

What a remarkable career! Sakuma truly is the Renaissance Man of J-Rock.

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The Music of Hayakawa Yoshio (4): “Letter to My Father”

Posted in J-Rock,Music by bourdaghs on the October 7th, 2013

(In anticipation of the October 18, 2013 concert by Hayakawa Yoshio and Sakuma Masahide at the University of Chicago, over the next few weeks I will be posting a series of entries here introducing Hayakawa’s music. More information about the concert, which is free and open to the public, is available here.)

HayakawYoshio

“Letter to My Father” 「父さんへの手紙」 appears on Hayakawa’s sixth solo album, Uta wa uta no nai tokoro kara kikoete kuru (Sony, 2000). Taking autobiographical materials as its source, the song explores a topic that Hayakawa also sometimes writes about in his published essays: his relations with his own family. Simultaneously elegiac and celebratory, the song explores the possibility that music can help us accomplish the work of mourning.

Video of Hayakawa performing “Letter to My Father” in a television appearance:

“Letter to My Father”
(Music and lyrics by Hayakawa Yoshio)
English translation by Michael Bourdaghs

Back in the days when my father was dating my mother
That line Dad spoke in front of the shaved-ice café:
‘I’ll wait here outside, so
You go in by yourself and have some.’

Such a funny dad
Drove me crazy, but I love him
The same blood flows in me

Hey, Dad, how you doing?
I’m still singing my songs
About that uncontrollable part inside of me
About those sad thoughts with nowhere to go

Still don’t understand a thing
Still seeking out beauty
Wish you could hear them, Dad

Hey, Dad, there’s this great place in Hakone Okuyumoto
Let’s go soak in the hot springs and watch the moon together

Me, I haven’t changed a bit, still a difficult person
Never feel the same as others do
Never go visit your grave, Dad
Just stare absentminded at the sky

But it’s not as if you were
Really there beneath the black soil;
Look within each heart

Hey, Dad, all those rituals and ceremonies, they’re just pointless, for show, right?
Hey, Dad, how do I become a good person?

Hey, Dad, I wish we’d shared more laughs, more heart-to-heart talks
Hey, Dad, let’s take Mom to watch the fireworks again someday

******

“Tōsan e no tegami”

Mukashi, tōsan ga kaasan to deito shita toki
Kōriya no mae de tōsan ga itta serifu
Watashi wa soto de matte imasu kara
Anata dake tabete kinasai

Sonna okashi na tōsan ga
Boku wa komaru kedo suki da yo
Onaji chi ga nagarete iru

Nee tōsan, ogenki desu ka
Are kara boku wa uta o utattemasu
Jibun no naka no te ni oenu bubun ya
Yukiba no nai kanashimi ya omoi o

Nani hitotsu wakatte nai kedo
Utsukushii mono o tsukamitakute
Tōsan ni mo kiite moraitakute

Nee tōsan, Hakone Okuyumoto ni ii onsen ga arunda
Nee tōsan, tsuki o minagara issho ni atatamarō yo

Aimokawarazu boku wa henkutsu na no de
Hito to onaji kimochi ni narenai
Tōsan no hakamairi ni mo ikazu
Bonyari to sora o nagametemasu

Kurai tsuchi no naka ni tōsan ga
Nemutte iru wake wa nai
Sorezore no kokoro no naka sa

Nee tōsan, arayuru gishiki wa wazatorashiku muda de kokkei na mono da yo ne
Nee tōsan, dōshitara boku wa sunao ni nareru no deshō ka

Nee tōsan, motto uchitokete shimijimi to katari warai aitakatta
Nee tōsan, mata kaasan to issho ni hanabi o miyō ne

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My Viennese Summer

Posted in Art,Books,Classical,Fiction,Music,Putting One Foot in Front of the Other by bourdaghs on the September 28th, 2013

I hope that you had a good summer, wherever and however you spent it. Classes at UChicago start Monday, so let me try to recap my own summer. For me, 2013 was the summer of Vienna, in imagination and reality.

The July 31 free concert by the Grant Park Orchestra in Millennium Park helped get things started. The program consisted of a single piece: the rarely performed Symphony No. 2 by Viennese composer Antonio Bruckner. It’s a delightfully sweet composition, especially in the slow movement, and the performance on a fine summer evening captured it quite gracefully. Mentally I was already walking alongside the Danube, the Blue Danube.

Around the same time, I began my background reading: two fine cultural histories of Vienna: Frederic Morton’s A Nervous Splendor: Vienna 1888-1889 (1980) and Carl E. Schorske’s Fin–de-siècle Vienna: Politics and Culture (1980). From there, I moved onto Stefan Zweig’s The World of Yesterday (1942), an elegiac memoir of the novelist’s life in Vienna that he completed in exile in South America, the day before he committed suicide. I also read Vienna Idylls, a collection of short stories by Arthur Schnitzler. It’s easy to understand why Freud loved Schnitzler: his fiction throbs with repressed desires and unspoken impulses. His characters say one thing, but clearly mean something entirely different. They think they desire one object, but obviously covet the exact opposite. Modernity in a nutshell.

On the morning of August 6, we arrived at the airport in Vienna, took the express train into the city and then the subway to Graben. The moment we emerged at the top of the escalator from the Stephansplatz underground and into the ancient plaza was stunning–as was the heat. We checked into our hotel and began a dazed four-day visit. The highlights for me were visiting Berggasse 19–the apartment where Sigmund Freud lived and worked from 1891 until 1938, when he went into exile after the Nazis took over Austria–and the Prater amusement park, home of the famous Ferris wheel. I’ve always loved carnivals and fairs (a few weeks after Vienna we made our annual pilgrimage to the Minnesota State Fair), and I especially liked Prater because it was the only time during our visit to Austria that we mingled with working class, immigrants, teen-agers: ordinary folks, out like us for a good time on a pleasant summer night.

Another highlight was the Secession museum, where we spent half an hour in the company of Klimt’s Beethoven freize.
the-beethoven-frieze-the-hostile-powers-left-part-detail.jpg!Blog
The Secession was also hosting an exhibit of the work of Thomas Locher, inspired by Jacques Derrida’s writings on Mauss and the gift–which have been enormously influential on my own scholarship. We had to rush through that exhibit, though, as the museum was closing. After exiting we wandered through the outdoor night market that lies just outside the museum.

In the two months since we returned from Vienna, I find myself stumbling into references to Vienna everywhere. Summer’s gone, but I’m still walking alongside the Danube.

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The Music of Hayakawa Yoshio (3): “The Most Beautiful Thing in this World”

Posted in J-Rock,Music by bourdaghs on the September 22nd, 2013

(In anticipation of the October 18, 2013 concert by Hayakawa Yoshio and Sakuma Masahide at the University of Chicago, over the next few weeks I will be posting a series of entries here introducing Hayakawa’s music. More information about the concert, which is free and open to the public, is available here.)

早川義夫 キレイ

“The Most Beautiful Thing in This World” (Kono yo de ichiban kirei na mono) is the title track from Hayakawa’s second solo album, released in 1994 on Sony Records. With music and lyrics by Hayakawa, this was the song by which he announced his return to active recording and performing after more than two decades of self-imposed exile from the music industry. During his years away from performing, Hayakawa managed a bookstore in the suburbs of Tokyo and published a number of books of essays.

You can hear the original 1994 recording of the song here:

The Most Beautiful Thing in This World
(Music and lyrics by Hayakawa Yoshio)
English translation by Michael Bourdaghs

Feel my weak heart in my fingertips
Trembling pathetically
Naked in front of you all
Curled up, wretched me.

Why do I sing these songs?
What do I want to say—and to whom?
Wish I’d been born a stronger man
But I can’t help it, this is who I am.

The most beautiful thing in this world
The thing you need the most
The vast cosmos that embraces us all
A single teardrop, life seeking life

The most beautiful thing is not somewhere out there
It waits inside of you
Be a good person, be simple and true
The heart that knows beauty is beauty

*****

Yowai kokoro ga yubisaki ni tsutawatte
Itaitashii hodo furuete iru
Minna no mae de hadaka ni natte
Chijikomatte iru mijime na boku

Naze ni boku wa uta o utau no darō
Dare ni nani o tsutaetai no darō
Motto tsuyoku umaretakatta
Shikata ga nai ne kore ga boku da mono

Kono yo de ichiban kirei na mono wa
Anata ni totte hitsuyō na mono
Bokura o tsutsumu sōdai na uchū
Hitoshizuku no namida motomeau inochi

Kirei na mono wa doko ka ni aru no dewa nakute
Anata no naka ni nemutteru mono nan da
Ii hito wa ii ne sunao de ii ne
Kirei to omou kokoro ga kirei na no sa

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The Music of Hayakawa Yoshio (2): “Salvia Flowers”

Posted in J-Rock,Music by bourdaghs on the September 17th, 2013

(In anticipation of the October 18, 2013 concert by Hayakawa Yoshio and Sakuma Masahide at the University of Chicago, over the next few weeks I will be posting a series of entries here introducing Hayakawa’s music. More information about the concert, which is free and open to the public, is available here.)

hayakawa yoshio kakko ii koto

The Jacks broke up after releasing two studio albums, and in 1969 Hayakawa recorded his first solo album. Things That Are Cool Are Somehow So Uncool (Kakko ii koto wa nante kakko warui darō). Released on the underground URC label, the LP received widespread acclaim, with critics in particular singling out the track “Salvia Flowers” (サルビアの花), with music by Hayakawa and lyrics by Aizawa Yasuko, for praise. Whereas The Jacks’ music had been primarily guitar-based, for his solo debut Hayakawa switched to piano as his main instrument.

With its achingly beautiful melody and elegiac lyrics, “Salvia Flowers” became Hayakawa’s most widely covered composition. It has subsequently been performed by numerous performers from across the popular music spectrum, ranging from Kuwata Keisuke (Southern All Stars) to Inoue Yōsui, Yuki Saori, Agata Morio, and Yamamoto Linda. It also remains a fixture of Hayakawa’s concert repertoire.

The original 1969 recording of “Salvia Flowers”:

Hayakawa performing the song with violinist Honzi on Japanese television circa 2005:

“Salvia Flowers” (Sarubia no hana)
(Music by Hayakawa Yoshio, lyrics by Aizawa Yasuko)
English translation by Michael Bourdaghs

Always, always wanted to do it: take salvia flowers
and drop them into your room
To cover your bed in red salvia flowers
And hold you till we die

And yet, and yet: you’ve gone to another
Even though my love is deeper

Weeping, I chased you through a storm of cherry blossoms
The church bell rang untrue

The doors opened and you appeared, the false flower-bride
Threw a glance at my stunned face
Weeping, I chased you through a storm of cherry blossoms
Falling and stumbling, falling and stumbling, I ran on and on

******

Itsumo itsumo omotteta sarubia no hana o
Anata no heya no naka ni nageiretakute
Soshite kimi no beddo ni sarubia no akai hana shikitsumete
Boku wa kimi o shinu made dakishimete iyō to

Nanoni nanoni dōshite hoka no hito no tokoro ni
Boku no ai no hō ga suteki nanoni

Nakinagara kimi no ato o oikakete hanafubuki mau michi o
Kyōkai no kane no ne wa nante usoppachi nanosa

Tobira ga aite dete kita kimi wa itsuwari no hanayome
Hoho o kowabarase boku o chiratto mita
Nakinagara kimi no ato o oikakete hanafubuki mau michi o
Korogenagara korogenagara hashiritsuzuketa no sa

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